National Association of the Deaf


This lists all blog postings by the NAD and individuals who have submitted blog entries for posting by the NAD. Some of these will also be in video format (vlogs), which we expect will increase over time.

We welcome your comments! Before you send these in, please first review our Blog Policy.

 

To nominate someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, one must submit a brief explanation of how a certain person embodies the NAD’s spirit. For some people who are deserving of this recognition, a simple 200-word explanation is not enough to capture everything that the person has done for our community! Lori Wakat is one of those people who have given so much and deserves a #NADHandwave from our community.

Lori is a teacher in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Community-Based classroom at Hinsdale South High School in Illinois. She has been a teacher in the program for over 30 years and has worn many different hats during her career. She has left a lasting impression on the MANY students that have graduated from the program. In addition to being a teacher who has influenced so many, people also know Lori for her role as the Jr. IAD sponsor and as the volleyball coach. She gets to school early in the morning ready to teach, and at the end of the school day, stays afterwards to sponsor or coach. Many hats indeed!

She has spent countless hours each day and night ensuring that the students feel welcomed and part of a community the moment they step on campus. Among the priceless gifts that Lori has brought to the students are hands on activities that build confidence, self-awareness, and satisfaction in them.

Lori is approaching retirement and her shoes will be difficult to fill at Hinsdale South! Thank you, Lori, for your many years of selfless service. The NAD recognizes and appreciates your loyal dedication towards deaf and hard of hearing youth, who are our future leaders.

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people for the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to progress. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

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The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

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Are you ready for the Junior NAD Conference in Florida this November?! Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind (FSDB) Jr. NAD members announce the conference theme. 
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NAD President Chris Wagner shares an update regarding the five priorities and upcoming events in this month's segment. Transcript and video description can be found here.

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[Video description can be found here. If you use a screen reader and need to access the caption file transcript, go to "More..." and click on "Transcript"]
 
In this second installment of Ask Howard Anything, NAD CEO Howard A. Rosenblum encourages the community to email letters of support for William Hoy to be inducted into the National Baseball's Hall of Fame.
 
For more information: www.nad.org/support-hoy.

In honor of Women’s History Month, the NAD is excited to recognize Janice Rosen as a recipient for this month’s #NADhandwave!  Janice Rosen is the Deaf Services Librarian in the Center for Accessibility at the DC Public Library, and has been since 1993.  Not only has she ensured access at the library for nearly the entire effective period of the Americans with Disabilities Act, but she has also been a wealth of information for the deaf and hard of hearing community by sharing postings about community and library events.

Before becoming a librarian, Janice worked part-time as coordinator of the Literacy for the Deaf Project at the DC Public Library (1990-1993) and tutored English at the Reading Center in George Washington University (1988-1990).  Prior to tutoring English, she also taught English at Gallaudet University for eight years.

Janice graduated from Gallaudet University in 1975 with a BA in Psychology.  She actually holds three Master’s Degrees: MA in Education from Western Maryland (now McDaniel) College, Westminster; MA in English Literature from George Washington University; and an MA in Library Science from Catholic University.  

Janice’s professional library activities include the American Library Association and Public Association membership since 1992.  She has served a number of leadership positions within the ALA, including Vice Chair, and Chair, Library Services to Hard of Hearing/Deaf Forum from 2004 to 2011; board member of the Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Roundtable from 2007-2010; and the Americans with Disabilities Act Assembly representing the Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Roundtable from 2003-2005.

Janice’s activities in the deaf and hard of hearing community include board membership of Quest Visual Theatre since 2009; board membership of Deaf-Reach (formerly known as the National Health Care Foundation for the Deaf) from 1999-2005; Secretary of the Washington Society of Jewish Deaf (WSJD) from 1995-2011; and Secretary of the Jewish Deaf Congress from 2012-2013.  She is also a founding member of the Association of Adult Musicians with Hearing Loss (2001) and has served as Treasurer since 2003.   

Janice enjoys playing the piano, clarinet, and singing as a hobby.  Currently, Janice is taking lessons at the International School of Music, a community music school in Bethesda, MD. 

Janice, the NAD thanks you for being a pioneer in your own right.  With over 20 years in the library field, your steadfast commitment to the deaf and hard of hearing community as a librarian and your dedication in ensuring sharing of information and library access is a great example for many.

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people who do the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to move. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

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The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

Do you live in Chicago? Are you near the area?  The NAD Board of Directors would like to meet you! Come and join us at the NAD Town Hall meeting on Saturday, April 18, 6:30p-9p (MOPD Field Office, 2102 W. Ogden Avenue, Chicago, IL).

Join us also for these other events:

  • Thursday 4/16 from 2-6pm: Board Meeting at Chicago Hearing Society, 2001 N Clybourn Ave, Chicago, IL
  • Friday 4/17 from 2-5pm: Board Meeting at Swoboda Deaf Center, 7050 W. Belmont Ave, Chicago, IL
  • Friday 4/17 from 6-8:30pm: Fundraising Dinner at Swoboda Deaf Center, 7050 W. Belmont Ave, Chicago, IL. RSVP at lorikrakora@gmail.com $30 in advance/$35 at door.
  • Friday 4/17 from 9:00pm-11:30pm: Duppies event at D’Agostino’s, 3131 N. Thatcher Ave, River Grove, IL
  • Saturday 4/18 from 9:00am-4:00pm Board Meeting at Swoboda Deaf Center, 7050 W. Belmont Ave, Chicago, IL

For more information, contact lizzie.sorkin@nad.org.

Thanks to: CCIAD, CHS, IAD, MOPD, SDC

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Samantha Altneu grew up in Central New Jersey.  She attended New York University (NYU), where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Social Work and Master of Social Work degrees. She worked for a year and a half at the NYU Langone Medical Center as a licensed medical social worker where she ensured safe and appropriate discharges for her patients. Samantha is currently a second-year law student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she is pursuing a specialization in health law.  Using social work as a background to foster her passion to have a deeper understanding of the potential social struggles that may present themselves in the legal cases she will handle, she hopes that she will be able to advocate for her clients more effectively while at the NAD and in her future professional endeavors.

 

Kylei Brooks is a senior at Gallaudet University studying psychology. She is involved in several organizations and is in a sorority. The only deaf person in her family, Kylei graduated from the Kansas State School for the Deaf in 2011. Her favorite hobbies are shopping, exploring nature, taking photos and dancing. After graduating from Gallaudet University, Kylei plans to travel the world, pursue a master’s degree in educational psychology and work in a Deaf school as a behavior support aide. One day she hopes that she can work in child protective services. Currently, she is an Education Advocacy Intern and she loves it!

 

 

Simone Chukwuezi works as a student attorney in the Civil Rights of Persons with Disabilities Law Clinic at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she is a second year law student. She has worked as an intern at the National Bar Association and plans to pursue a career in family law.

 

 

 

 

 

Hailey Cutts is in her fourth year as an undergraduate student at Gallaudet University. Her favorite hobbies are drawing, running, bike riding, hiking and reading. Hailey’s personal goal is to keep motivated and to achieve her goal to become a successful graphic designer. She is a graphic design intern.

 

 

 

 

 

John Delaney is a student at the University of Maryland School of Law and is working at the NAD through the Civil Rights for Persons with Disabilities Clinic at Maryland.  He is interested in education, employment, and disability law, and he is looking forward to learning more under the tutelage of Marc Charmatz and Caroline Jackson.  Before law school, John worked as a fourth grade teacher at Holy Trinity School in Washington, DC, and Visitation BVM School in Philadelphia, PA.  He earned his master’s in elementary education from Saint Joseph’s University while working at Visitation BVM. He also attended St. Joe’s for undergrad as a double major in Economics and Ancient Studies.  His interests include cooking (burgers with homemade buns!), playing his guitar, playing/watching sports (basketball is his favorite to play, baseball to watch.  Go O’s!), traveling (the warmer the better), and FaceTiming with his one year old niece.

Kaylee Gress, a fifth year student at Gallaudet University studying Communication Studies, will graduate in May 2015 with B.A. in communication studies. She was born in Enid, Oklahoma and raised in Bellevue, Nebraska. Kaylee grew up in mainstream schools in deaf or hard hearing programs in Omaha and Ralston public schools. She enjoys reading, foreign movies, traveling, and hanging out with family and friends. Kaylee is the first deaf person in her military family. She is a member of the Delta Zeta sorority. Kaylee loves working with people and is currently Resident Assistant/Team Leader for Residence Life at Gallaudet University. After graduation, Kaylee hopes to become an advocate in the deaf community and become effective in the communication field. Kaylee enjoys working as a communications intern!

 

Jenny Han was born in South Korea and lived there for six years until her family moved to Canada. She grew up familiar with three languages, Korean, English and ASL. Jenny’s interest in the art world led her to two different colleges. She enrolled in a two-year 2D animation program at Capilano University and after graduating, she continues to improve and add to her skills at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) where she is majoring in illustration and minoring in psychology. Recently Jenny became a media assistant for the Asian Deaf Club (ADC). She hopes to find a career in the animation industry after finishing her studies at RIT. Currently, she is an animation intern.

 

 

Jamie Lee is originally from Silver Spring, Maryland. She is currently a student attorney at the NAD, as part of the Civil Rights of Persons with Disabilities Law Clinic. She is pursuing a law degree at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, specializing in antitrust law. Before law school, Jamie was a paralegal at Hunton & Williams LLP, working in the firm’s Competition practice.  She also had the opportunity to serve the Obama Administration as a White House intern where she responded to letters sent to the President and coordinated events that the President attended.  In her free time, Jamie loves to learn foreign languages (she currently speaks Spanish and Korean), hang out with friends, and explore new restaurants.

 

 

Xheni Llaguri is a third year law student at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, and she is currently completing her clinical program at the NAD as a Clinic I student attorney. She is also serving as Managing Editor for the Journal of Health Care Law and Policy, President of the Immigration Law and Policy Association, and as a volunteer with Project HEAL at the Kennedy Krieger Institute. Prior to law school, she obtained her Master's in Education from George Mason University and served as a Teach for America corps member, teaching elementary school in Washington, D.C. Xheni received her bachelor's degree in Anthropology and Political Science from the University of Maryland, College Park. She enjoys traveling, reading fiction, and outdoor markets. She resides in beautiful Baltimore, MD.

 

Rachel Martin is from Hagerstown, Maryland.  She works at the NAD as a clinic II student attorney in the Civil Rights of Persons with Disabilities Law Clinic at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she is a third year law student.  Rachel has previously worked as a legal intern in the Office of the State's Attorney for Frederick County, Maryland; the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, Appellate Division; the Maryland State Senate; and the Circuit Court for Frederick County, Maryland.  Rachel plans to pursue a career in public policy or public interest law.

 

 

 

Hammad Rasul was born in Pakistan and grew up in Olney, Maryland.  He works at the NAD as a clinic I student attorney in the Civil Rights of Persons with Disabilities Law Clinic at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where he is a third year law student.  Hammad has previously worked as a legal intern at the Maryland Office of Attorney General and International Fidelity Insurance Company. He is a member of the Alternative Dispute Resolution team at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Hammad is also an Articles Editor at the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class, where he published an article on trademark implications related to the controversy surrounding the Washington Redskins’ name.

 

 

Eric Suarez is from Miami, Florida.  He works at the NAD as a clinic I student attorney in the Civil Rights of Persons with Disabilities Law Clinic at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where he is a second year law student. Eric has previously worked as a law clerk at the Law Office of the Miguel Palmeiro, LLC; and as a legal intern at the Maryland DLLR's Office of Financial Regulation, Department of Licensing. Eric also serves as the President of the Latina/o Law Students Association at the Maryland Carey Law and will explore careers in health law.

 

 

 

Michael Snyder is a sophomore majoring in Government and International Studies at Gallaudet University.  He was raised in Indiana until his teens and then he moved to Florida. After almost 13 years of working in his grandparent’s company, he found his passion in government and decided to enroll in college. His goals are to finish his studies at Gallaudet University, enroll in law school, and then work for an organization for deaf and hard of hearing people. Michael is a member of the Rainbow Society and is the president of a newly formed organization, Phi Delta Phi (a prelaw honor society). He is an avid reader, enjoys spending time with others, loves food, and pop culture. He is a public policy intern.

Have you met Michael Kwame Agyin?  The NAD learned about him through the National Black Deaf Advocates (NBDA) celebration of Black History Month – we believe you should learn about him and his work too!  He has over 15 years of experience in working with youth with disabilities in California.

Michael is the son of West African immigrant parents and was raised in Compton, California. He learned American Sign Language (ASL) while earning his bachelor's degree in sociology from California State University, Northridge (CSUN).  After earning his degree, Michael was determined to break the barrier between deaf and hearing worlds by building a bridge for youth of color with disabilities. As a job coach for the Marriott Foundation Bridges Program and youth advocate, he is able to break down such barriers. He is also the first deaf member of the Public Allies Los Angeles; an AmeriCorps fellowship program dedicated to engaging and advancing a diverse group of young leaders in an effort to strengthen communities, non-profit organizations, and civic participation. 

Michael was appointed Outreach Coordinator for Los Angeles council member Tony Cardenas' Deafestival, which he still serves. Deafestival is a citywide event to raise awareness, promote pride, and recognize the accomplishments of the deaf community. Los Angeles City Council President Herb Wesson honored Michael for his work, "Michael is an impressive role-model, not just for the deaf community, but for everyone."

Michael served as the point person for issues impacting deaf and hard of hearing people and people with disabilities in the office of the Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa in the Neighborhood and Community Services Department. He established the Disability Hire LA Youth pilot program, which helps youth with disabilities obtain summer jobs while providing them with internship and leadership opportunities throughout the City of Los Angeles.

Michael spent four years on the Youth Leadership Governing Board of the National Youth Leadership Network and continues to be an enthusiastic veteran volunteer for the Youth Leadership Forum based in Sacramento. Former Governor of California Arnold Schwarzenegger appointed Michael to the State Independent Living Council.  Currently, Michael serves as president of Hear Zero, an African American Deaf Advocacy group in the Los Angeles region.

Michael, thank you for your important advocacy – your 15+ years of experience in programs and services for youth with disabilities is a great example for all of us.

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people who do the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to move. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

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The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.  

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Got a question you've been wanting to ask the NAD CEO, Howard A. Rosenblum? Looking for some clarification regarding a lawsuit? Wondering what the status is about something? The NAD is thrilled to begin a new video series, "Ask Howard Anything" to give YOU an opportunity to have your questions answered. Further information about online video clips can be found here.

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) introduces Ashley Clark Fry as this month’s #NADhandwave recipient! Ashley is a deaf woman from Wyoming who promotes American Sign Language (ASL) in just 15 seconds using social media. 

A social media platform, Instagram, allows users to post 15 second videos. Ashley saw this as an opportunity to promote ASL to those who are also on Instagram.  You can find her at @signedwithheart).  Her first post on Instagram introduces #signedwithheart to make learning ASL “easy and fun.” 

  • Fact, as of Thursday, January 29, 2015 – 11:00am, there are 197,311 posts on Instagram using #ASL.
  • Fact, learning ASL is the number one hit on NAD.org search.
  • Fact, ASL Teachers Association  (ASLTA.org) is an individual membership organization of more than 1,000 ASL and Deaf Studies educators from elementary through graduate education as well as agencies!
  • Fact, there are many deaf and hard of hearing people teaching ASL using Instagram – such as @ASL_NYC, @learn_a_s_l, and so on.

Ashley emphasizes that she is not a certified ASL instructor and encourages people to take ASL classes at a local community college or university if one is looking for class credits or a more formal curriculum.  Using social media, Ashley has reached out to over 2,000 followers!

The NAD thanks you, Ashley, for being innovative and being an ASL advocate using Social Media! 

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people who do the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to move. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

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The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.