National Association of the Deaf



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For June's AHA segment, Howard A. Rosenblum discusses Video Remote Interpreting (VRI). The AHA Series is also available at www.nad.org/AHA. If you're reading from your mobile, you can view the video here.

Deaf and hard of hearing people live throughout the world, and many of them come to the United States in search of education, employment, and/or a better life. Demir Bekiri, this month’s #NADhandwave recipient, is one of those remarkable deaf individuals who came into the United States and not only found everything he was looking for, but also devoted his life to sharing the American Dream with so many others who came after him.

Demir was born and raised in Grncari, Macedonia, which was part of the former Yugoslavia. When he was 20 years old, he came to the United States and settled in Chicago. He did not know ASL or English, but found the deaf community in Chicago and quickly learned both languages. He met and married his wife Demetra, and had two sons. He also found work and had everything he could want.

But he saw many other deaf immigrants struggling with adapting to American life and becoming citizens. In 2003, he worked with other leaders to create an organization dedicated to assisting deaf immigrants, primarily from Eastern Europe but welcoming those from other parts of the world as well – Deaf European American Association of Chicago (DEAAC). 

Through this organization, he and other dedicated people created a school to train deaf and hard of hearing immigrants on English, ASL, American life, and passing the US citizenship exam. This program is called the Deaf Adults Education Access Program (DAEAP): http://www.deaac.org/#!blank/cxoj  Remarkably, this program has a 100% passing rate for every student to pass the citizenship examination!!

Demir is known in the Chicago area as having a huge heart, helping everyone in need, and never seeking recognition. Despite his humility, all deaf immigrants in the Chicago area know who he is and have elected him as President of DEAAC for nearly the entire existence of the organization.

The NAD recognizes his commitment and dedication to ensuring equal access for all deaf and hard of hearing immigrants, who deserve the same chance at life in the USA as all other immigrants.

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people for the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to progress. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

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The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

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How do you sign the "National Association of the Deaf"? We're curious to see if anyone has a better way of signing the organization's name!  Do you have an ASL sign idea to share with us? Send it in by July 1, 2015! The winning sign will be announced at the NAD Leadership Training Conference (NLTC) in Birmingham, Alabama this September. If you're reading this from your mobile, view the video here.
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In this month's AHA segment, NAD CEO Howard A. Rosenblum shares one of the things people have been talking about on Facebook, the appropriate use of ASL for the "National Association of the Deaf, NAD". If you're reading from your mobile, watch the video from here.

The NAD wishes to recognize Cathy Corrado as this month’s #NADhandwave recipient for her time and energy investing in the deaf and hard of hearing youth. Thanks to her efforts, the annual “Biztown” event which is part of the Junior Achievement program, has helped give many local deaf and hard of hearing students an opportunity to learn about business, economics, finances and life-skills.

Biztown, originally for hearing 4-6th graders, gives students a hands-on experience; they take on a role as a business owner, employee, taxpayer and consumer. This incredible program fosters the idea of learning outside the classroom.  Cathy recognized the need for deaf and hard of hearing mainstream students between 5th and 12th grades to participate in this beneficial opportunity. As a result, Biztown has given a positive impact for over 200 deaf and hard of hearing students! With Biztown, students are able to engage with each other, make new friends, discover a career, and share their goals with each other.  Prior to the one-day event, itinerant teachers and mainstream programs teachers spend about 6-10 weeks training their students on business-based and financial literacy-focused curriculum. Deaf and hard of hearing community members including vocational rehabilitation counselors, Starbucks employees, Boeing employees, and more are always invited to Biztown, as well.

Cathy is a trainer and consultant for Washington State's Center for Childhood Deafness and Hearing Loss (CDHL). Her area of focus is literacy including reading, writing, and content areas.  Her responsibilities also include classroom assessment that helps guide instruction in the classroom.  Before arriving at CDHL, Cathy taught in a self-contained deaf and hard of hearing classroom for 28 years at the elementary level for Tacoma Public Schools.  She was also an itinerant teacher for 2 years where she worked with deaf and hard of hearing students who did not attend the self-contained program.  

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people for the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to progress. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

###

The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

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We're waiting for you! Watch and learn what the five rounds look like from the 2014 competition. If you're reading from your mobile, watch here.

The NAD Board had a very successful weekend in Chicago, Illinois during April 15-19!  Amidst the busy and packed schedule to visit local schools and meet with the local deaf and hard of hearing community -- the NAD Board also had a very productive meeting. Enjoy the photos here!  Also, while in Chicago, the Board members shared their report -- you can view them below:

 

To nominate someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, one must submit a brief explanation of how a certain person embodies the NAD’s spirit. For some people who are deserving of this recognition, a simple 200-word explanation is not enough to capture everything that the person has done for our community! Lori Wakat is one of those people who have given so much and deserves a #NADHandwave from our community.

Lori is a teacher in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Community-Based classroom at Hinsdale South High School in Illinois. She has been a teacher in the program for over 30 years and has worn many different hats during her career. She has left a lasting impression on the MANY students that have graduated from the program. In addition to being a teacher who has influenced so many, people also know Lori for her role as the Jr. IAD sponsor and as the volleyball coach. She gets to school early in the morning ready to teach, and at the end of the school day, stays afterwards to sponsor or coach. Many hats indeed!

She has spent countless hours each day and night ensuring that the students feel welcomed and part of a community the moment they step on campus. Among the priceless gifts that Lori has brought to the students are hands on activities that build confidence, self-awareness, and satisfaction in them.

Lori is approaching retirement and her shoes will be difficult to fill at Hinsdale South! Thank you, Lori, for your many years of selfless service. The NAD recognizes and appreciates your loyal dedication towards deaf and hard of hearing youth, who are our future leaders.

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people for the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to progress. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

###

The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

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Are you ready for the Junior NAD Conference in Florida this November?! Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind (FSDB) Jr. NAD members announce the conference theme. 
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NAD President Chris Wagner shares an update regarding the five priorities and upcoming events in this month's segment. Transcript and video description can be found here.

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National Association of the Deaf | 8630 Fenton Street, Suite 820, Silver Spring, MD 20910-3819