National Association of the Deaf



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In this month's AHA segment, NAD CEO Howard A. Rosenblum shares one of the things people have been talking about on Facebook, the appropriate use of ASL for the "National Association of the Deaf, NAD". If you're reading from your mobile, watch the video from here.

The NAD wishes to recognize Cathy Corrado as this month’s #NADhandwave recipient for her time and energy investing in the deaf and hard of hearing youth. Thanks to her efforts, the annual “Biztown” event which is part of the YMCA's Junior Achievement program, has helped give many local deaf and hard of hearing students an opportunity to learn about business, economics, finances and life-skills.

Biztown, originally for hearing 4-6th graders, gives students a hands-on experience; they take on a role as a business owner, employee, taxpayer and consumer. This incredible program fosters the idea of learning outside the classroom.  Cathy recognized the need for deaf and hard of hearing mainstream students between 5th and 12th grades to participate in this beneficial opportunity. As a result, Biztown has given a positive impact for over 200 deaf and hard of hearing students! With Biztown, students are able to engage with each other, make new friends, discover a career, and share their goals with each other.  Prior to the one-day event, itinerant teachers and mainstream programs teachers spend about 6-10 weeks training their students on business-based and financial literacy-focused curriculum. Deaf and hard of hearing community members including vocational rehabilitation counselors, Starbucks employees, Boeing employees, and more are always invited to Biztown, as well.

Cathy is a trainer and consultant for Washington State's Center for Childhood Deafness and Hearing Loss (CDHL). Her area of focus is literacy including reading, writing, and content areas.  Her responsibilities also include classroom assessment that helps guide instruction in the classroom.  Before arriving at CDHL, Cathy taught in a self-contained deaf and hard of hearing classroom for 28 years at the elementary level for Tacoma Public Schools.  She was also an itinerant teacher for 2 years where she worked with deaf and hard of hearing students who did not attend the self-contained program.  

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people for the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to progress. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

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The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

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We're waiting for you! Watch and learn what the five rounds look like from the 2014 competition. If you're reading from your mobile, watch here.

The NAD Board had a very successful weekend in Chicago, Illinois during April 15-19!  Amidst the busy and packed schedule to visit local schools and meet with the local deaf and hard of hearing community -- the NAD Board also had a very productive meeting. Enjoy the photos here!  Also, while in Chicago, the Board members shared their report -- you can view them below:

 

To nominate someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, one must submit a brief explanation of how a certain person embodies the NAD’s spirit. For some people who are deserving of this recognition, a simple 200-word explanation is not enough to capture everything that the person has done for our community! Lori Wakat is one of those people who have given so much and deserves a #NADHandwave from our community.

Lori is a teacher in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Community-Based classroom at Hinsdale South High School in Illinois. She has been a teacher in the program for over 30 years and has worn many different hats during her career. She has left a lasting impression on the MANY students that have graduated from the program. In addition to being a teacher who has influenced so many, people also know Lori for her role as the Jr. IAD sponsor and as the volleyball coach. She gets to school early in the morning ready to teach, and at the end of the school day, stays afterwards to sponsor or coach. Many hats indeed!

She has spent countless hours each day and night ensuring that the students feel welcomed and part of a community the moment they step on campus. Among the priceless gifts that Lori has brought to the students are hands on activities that build confidence, self-awareness, and satisfaction in them.

Lori is approaching retirement and her shoes will be difficult to fill at Hinsdale South! Thank you, Lori, for your many years of selfless service. The NAD recognizes and appreciates your loyal dedication towards deaf and hard of hearing youth, who are our future leaders.

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people for the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to progress. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

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The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

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Are you ready for the Junior NAD Conference in Florida this November?! Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind (FSDB) Jr. NAD members announce the conference theme. 
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NAD President Chris Wagner shares an update regarding the five priorities and upcoming events in this month's segment. Transcript and video description can be found here.

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[Video description can be found here. If you use a screen reader and need to access the caption file transcript, go to "More..." and click on "Transcript"]
 
In this second installment of Ask Howard Anything, NAD CEO Howard A. Rosenblum encourages the community to email letters of support for William Hoy to be inducted into the National Baseball's Hall of Fame.
 
For more information: www.nad.org/support-hoy.

In honor of Women’s History Month, the NAD is excited to recognize Janice Rosen as a recipient for this month’s #NADhandwave!  Janice Rosen is the Deaf Services Librarian in the Center for Accessibility at the DC Public Library, and has been since 1993.  Not only has she ensured access at the library for nearly the entire effective period of the Americans with Disabilities Act, but she has also been a wealth of information for the deaf and hard of hearing community by sharing postings about community and library events.

Before becoming a librarian, Janice worked part-time as coordinator of the Literacy for the Deaf Project at the DC Public Library (1990-1993) and tutored English at the Reading Center in George Washington University (1988-1990).  Prior to tutoring English, she also taught English at Gallaudet University for eight years.

Janice graduated from Gallaudet University in 1975 with a BA in Psychology.  She actually holds three Master’s Degrees: MA in Education from Western Maryland (now McDaniel) College, Westminster; MA in English Literature from George Washington University; and an MA in Library Science from Catholic University.  

Janice’s professional library activities include the American Library Association and Public Association membership since 1992.  She has served a number of leadership positions within the ALA, including Vice Chair, and Chair, Library Services to Hard of Hearing/Deaf Forum from 2004 to 2011; board member of the Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Roundtable from 2007-2010; and the Americans with Disabilities Act Assembly representing the Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Roundtable from 2003-2005.

Janice’s activities in the deaf and hard of hearing community include board membership of Quest Visual Theatre since 2009; board membership of Deaf-Reach (formerly known as the National Health Care Foundation for the Deaf) from 1999-2005; Secretary of the Washington Society of Jewish Deaf (WSJD) from 1995-2011; and Secretary of the Jewish Deaf Congress from 2012-2013.  She is also a founding member of the Association of Adult Musicians with Hearing Loss (2001) and has served as Treasurer since 2003.   

Janice enjoys playing the piano, clarinet, and singing as a hobby.  Currently, Janice is taking lessons at the International School of Music, a community music school in Bethesda, MD. 

Janice, the NAD thanks you for being a pioneer in your own right.  With over 20 years in the library field, your steadfast commitment to the deaf and hard of hearing community as a librarian and your dedication in ensuring sharing of information and library access is a great example for many.

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) gives monthly #NADHandwaves to people in our community. This is great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people who do the work they do. With such great people, the world continues to move. If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestion online!

###

The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

Do you live in Chicago? Are you near the area?  The NAD Board of Directors would like to meet you! Come and join us at the NAD Town Hall meeting on Saturday, April 18, 6:30p-9p (MOPD Field Office, 2102 W. Ogden Avenue, Chicago, IL).

Join us also for these other events:

  • Thursday 4/16 from 2-6pm: Board Meeting at Chicago Hearing Society, 2001 N Clybourn Ave, Chicago, IL
  • Friday 4/17 from 2-5pm: Board Meeting at Swoboda Deaf Center, 7050 W. Belmont Ave, Chicago, IL
  • Friday 4/17 from 6-8:30pm: Fundraising Dinner at Swoboda Deaf Center, 7050 W. Belmont Ave, Chicago, IL. RSVP at lorikrakora@gmail.com $30 in advance/$35 at door.
  • Friday 4/17 from 9:00pm-11:30pm: Duppies event at D’Agostino’s, 3131 N. Thatcher Ave, River Grove, IL
  • Saturday 4/18 from 9:00am-4:00pm Board Meeting at Swoboda Deaf Center, 7050 W. Belmont Ave, Chicago, IL

For more information, contact lizzie.sorkin@nad.org.

Thanks to: CCIAD, CHS, IAD, MOPD, SDC

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