National Association of the Deaf

Justice



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Deaf and hard of hearing individuals face greater legal challenges due to communication barriers that are typically not recognized by lawyers, courts, or police.  In encounters with the police, lack of communication may result in detention without the ability to call one’s lawyer.  When a deaf or hard of hearing person is not able to communicate with a lawyer, there is no real representation.  When a deaf or hard of hearing person does not understand what is going on in the courtroom, justice has not been served.

The key question to ask is:  What must be done to ensure effective communication in the legal setting?  For instance, a deaf or hard of hearing individual requires effective communication to truly meet with and communicate with a lawyer.  This can be provided in a variety of ways, such as qualified interpreters, real-time captioning (or CART) or other accommodations.  Furthermore, deaf or and hard of hearing individuals have similar rights when encountering the police, jail officials, and the courts.

The NAD has won greater access in the legal system for deaf and hard of hearing individuals.  Police officers now receive more training about the rights of deaf and hard of hearing individuals.  Jails and prisons are implementing procedures to ensure that deaf and hard o